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Frequently Asked Questions about Adoption

  1. Why do children become available for adoption?
  2. What are the requirements for adoption?
  3. How long will it take?
  4. What is involved in the adoption process?
  5. Is a child's background information available?
  6. What happens after the child is placed?
  7. May I take a foster child into my home and then adopt him or her?
  8. Is there a Web site with information about special needs adoptions?

 

  1. Why do children become available for adoption?
    There are many reasons children become available for adoption. Most often children enter foster care because they are abused, neglected or dependent. If the family's problems cannot be resolved, the courts will legally free the child for adoption.
  2. What are the requirements for adoption?
    There are many myths about adoption. In truth you can be a working mother, or single, or have other children. You don't have to have a religious affiliation. Basic requirements are: suitable living arrangement, reasonably good health, adequate income, stable marriage and flexibility.
  3. How long will it take?
    Preparation and approval takes at least four to six months. The length of time it takes for placement depends on the type of child desired.
  4. What is involved in the adoption process?
    A consultation in your home, group preparation sessions and/or individual sessions are part of the preparation process. This helps families to understand the feelings of the children and helps staff get to know the families. These activities help applicants determine the type of child/children they will be able to parent most effectively.
  5. Is a child's background information available?
    All known important information on the biological parents; information about the child's placements; and educational, medical and developmental history are provided to the adoptive family. If an older child is being placed, the information is expanded to include eating, sleeping and play habits, fears, relationships, school experiences and all important information. All information the agency has is shared with the adoptive parents.
  6. What happens after the child is placed?
    A social worker visits you monthly to help with any situation that arises. Support services are offered for the adoptive parents and child to help with problems. Parents who have adopted previously are available to share experiences and knowledge. There is a statewide adoption support group as well as local chapters. The agency is able to assist you in locating an appropriate support service.
  7. May I take a foster child into my home and then adopt him or her?
    Foster care is temporary care. The goal of foster care it to reunite the child with his birth parents. In the event the plan for the child becomes adoption, foster parents may apply to adopt. In selecting adoptive families the best interest of the child is always of utmost importance.
  8. Is there a Web site with information about special needs adoptions?
    Information about the processes and procedures involved in adoption matters can be obtained by accessing the Special Needs Adoption Program (SNAP) Web Page.

 

Last Updated 4/4/2008
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